Washington County Iowa Sheriff’s Report July 21-July 27, 2014

freedigitalphotos.com

7/24/2014 02:39 1405897 Fraud 

Location: Riverside 

DCI AGENT I337 ADVISES CREDIT CARD FRAUD AT THE CASINO, REQUESTING ASSISTANCE.

92-18 AND 92-7 RESPONDED TO ASSIST. 92-7 TRANSPORTED ONE FEMALE TO THE JAIL FOR

I337. ARRESTED:50 year old male from CHICAGO,IL OFF/CREDIT CARD FRAUD AND THEFT 3RD.

 

7/24/2014 11:11 1405905 FRAUD 

Location: RIVERSIDE 

CALLER REPORTS LOCATING A WALLET THIS MORINING AT THE BUSINESS AND WOULD LIKE A

DEPUTY TO PICK IT UP. || 92-2 RESPONDED, WALLET TURNED OVER TO THE DCI.

 

7/24/2014 22:45 1405924 WELFARE CHECK 

Location: AINSWORTH, IA 52201 

CALLER REQUESTS A WELFARE CHECK ON AN INTOXICATED FEMALE WHO CONTACTED THEM

MAKING SUICIDAL STATEMENTS. 92-18, 92-15 AND 92-54 RESPONDED. 92-18 TRANSPORTED THE

SUBJECT TO THE WASHINGTON COUNTY HOSPITAL FOR FURTHER EVALUATION ARRIVING AT

 7/25/2014 9:29 1405935 TRAFFIC ACCIDENT 

Location: AINSWORTH, IA 52201 

CALLER REPORTS DAMAGE TO HER VEHICLE OCCURRED WHILE WORKING AT THE 4 CORNERS

RESTAURANT THIS MORNING, A SEMI ROLLED FORWARD AND HIT HER TRUCK THAT WAS

PARKED IN THE BACK LOT. CALLER AND SEMI DRIVER EXCHANGED INSURANCE INFORMATION;

DOCUMENTATION REQUESTED.

 

7/25/2014 21:49 1405958 RUNAWAYS/MISSING 

PERSON 

Location: RIVERSIDE

FAMILY MEMBER RECENTLY MOVED IN WITH THEM. TONIGHT HE DROPPED OFF THEIR

DAUGHTER IN IOWA CITY AROUND 5PM & HAS NOT MADE IT HOME. @ 9PM WAS AT WALGREENS

ON MORMON TREK IN IOWA CITY. Missing: 81 YOA. TTY WAS SENT OUT FOR AN ATL. CALLER ADVISED HE RETURNED HOME & WAS OKAY.

 

7/26/2014 16:18 1405980 TRAFFIC STOP SERIOUS 

Location: RIVERSIDE 

VEHICLE STOP ON HIGHWAY 218 NORTH OF HIGHWAY 22 WITH TRUCK LIC/CHG391 AND TRAILER

LIC/4958MO. IHP 77 ALSO RESPONDED. 92-10 ARRESTED38 year old male from IOWA CITY, IA. OFFENSE/DRIVING WHILE BARRED.

 

7/26/2014 16:32 1405982 TRESPASS 

Location: RIVERSIDE 

CALLER REPORTS TWO SUBJECTS ON FOUR WHEELERS ARE ON THEIR PRIVATE LANE. THERE

IS BOTH A SIGN AND A GATE UP, THEY HAVE DONE THIS IN THE PAST AS WELL. REQUESTING A

DEPUTY. 92-72 AND 92-75 RESPONDED. CALLER IS REQUESTING DOCUMENTATION. DEPUTIES

WILL ATTEMPT TO LOCATE THE SUSPECTS TO SPEAK WITH THEM.

 

7/26/2014 23:05 1405994 DRUG/NARCOTICS 

VIOLATION 

Location: RIVERSIDE 

VEHICLE STOP ON HWY 22 NEAR RED OAK AVENUE WITH LIC/767YYA. 92-15 ALSO RESPONDED.

CHARGES PENDING PER DCI LAB RESULTS ON Male from WELLMAN FOR POSSESSION OF A CONTROLLED SUBSTANCE AND POSSESSION OF DRUG PARAPHERNALIA.

 

7/26/2014 23:43 1405999 PUBLIC INTOX 

Location: RIVERSIDE 

CALLER REPORTS PLACING A SUBJECT UNDER ARREST AT THE CASINO. 92-11 ARRESTED

23 year old male from Riverside, OFFENSE/PUBLIC

INTOXICATION 3RD AND SUBSEQUENT AND INTEREFERENCE WITH OFFICIAL ACTS.

 

7/27/2014 9:47 1406007 SUSPICIOUS ACTIVITY 

Location: RIVERSIDE 

ON THE WEST SIDE BETWEEN CONDOS TWO AND THREE AND THE GOLF COURSE THERE IS A

WHITE MALE SLEEPING IN THE BUSHES. 92-11 RESPONDED AND SPOKE WITH

the male subject. HE WILL BE ON HIS WAY HOME. INFORMATION WILL BE

FORWARDED TO 92-9.

 

7/27/2014 22:55 1406021 INTIMIDATION/HARASSMENT 

Location: RIVERSIDE 

CALLER REPORTS MALE SUBJECT IS HARRASSING HER || 92-7 LEFT A MESSAGE FOR THE

CALLER. DOCUMENTATION.

 

 

 

 

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Kiene Places Second in West Liberty Demo Derby

kienedemonumber98

kienewestlibertydemosecond placeRiverside’s Brett Kiene won second in the July 20  Demo Derby in West Liberty. Brett has been racing his 1991 Oldsmobile Cutlass Cierra in the welded compact class in Riverside, Washington, West Liberty and Columbus Junction for a year now. Given to him by his grandpa Kiene, the car bares the #98 in honor of a friend lost to Cancer. Although, having a passion for the big hits is part of it, Brett knows what it takes to get going in demo…aside from being able to get in, strap in and put the peddle down, that is.

Brett says to start in demo, you need friends, sponsors, a love of working on cars and no enemies. Brett attributes his success to those close to him.

I could not have done this without help from a lot of friends and family Support. Thank you to my wife Jennifer, Chad Sexton, Cory Sexton, Brendan Serum, Seth Burrows, Craig Sexton, the Walmsley family, Lexi, Carrie Sexton and can’t Forget Kyle Sexton!

Brett races tomorrow (July 26) at 7PM in Columbus Junction.

kienedemonumber98

 

Posted in announcement, Community, Event, Informative, Iowa, News Tagged with: , , , , ,

LESSON SEVEN, Part I: If it doesn’t fit, you must uh… If it doesn’t fit, you must uh…quit, if it doesn’t fit, you must uh quit.  IF IT DOESN’T FIT, YOU MUST QUIT!

***Please read the disclaimer to the right. The following is the latest in several installments by former teacher and school board member for the Highland Community School District, Nick Smith. They are lessons to a future student, Cal-Em (read Screwed: Lesson #1  and Screwed: Lesson #2 , Screwed: Lesson #3, Part I,   Screwed: Lesson #3, Part II , Screwed: LESSON 4–I START AGAIN , Lesson 5: A Nation At Risk report [part 1]Lesson 5: A Nation at Risk report [part 2],  Screwed: LESSON 5–A Nation at Risk report [part 3])Screwed: LESSON 6, Napolians and Mussolinis and demi-gods Oh, my! [repeat several times, then follow the yellow brick road.]

Nick SmithLETTERS TO CAL-EM A PERSONAL HISTORY OF HIGHLAND

By Nick Smith

 

“October 4, 1957. Radio transmitters began picking up a high-pitched sound from space. The Soviet Union had just launched the world’s first artificial satellite. Even though Sputnik did nothing but beep, many Americans feared that our cold-war enemy would soon be dropping bombs and spying on us from space. Congress declared that America had fallen behind in the space race because the nation’s children were weak in math and science. Without verifying this assertion, they passed the National Defense Education Act of 1958. As chief rocket engineer Wernher von Braun put it, the new soldier would carry a slide rule instead of a gun.

“The $9 billion legislation gave money to schools for the development of courses and facilities that would prepare students to go to college to study math, science, and engineering. Within the year, schools had remodeled labs and revamped curriculum.

“The drive for military and technological superiority eventually paid off.  But the focus on preparing students to go to college to study math, science and engineering widened the gap between rich and poor and denigrated the importance of the arts and humanities and anyone who studied them. Schools also shortchanged average students, contributing to what would become the erosion of what was once America’s great middle class.

“Even as Americans won the space race by walking on the moon, the vision of the American education system had grown so narrow that school officials and politicians were unprepared to meet the challenges of the cultural revolution of the sixties” (Joan Cutuly, The Gulliver Initiative, 2014).

I learned my ABC’s under two specific educational philosophies.  The first was the Discipline Approach to curriculum and instruction.  Educators asked what an expert in a particular field of study would need to know, and then they applied the answer to that question to their curriculum and taught toward the goal of specific Discipline knowledge.  The second was the Modular Schedule Approach.  I thrived on this approach.  I especially loved the long day because so much could be accomplished during the longer period.

I am only mentioning Sputnik and modular scheduling, Cal-Em, because both represented some sort of structure for providing a meaningful education when I attended high school.  Would I say they were the best methods for instruction?  No.   There is, in my opinion, no magic methodology for teaching.  What I want you to understand is that we had something.  There was an overall plan and an overall direction to education.  At least the institution seemed to be moving in the same direction.

There was, however, nothing when I arrived at Highland.  There was no curriculum, no unified plan of instruction, no rhyme or reason to the daily structure.  Some teachers had their own curriculum and lesson plans but others didn’t use a plan at all.  Teachers operated almost like private contractors, each delivering their own bits and pieces of knowledge as the teacher saw fit.   There was absolutely no philosophy or vision or mission to guide the Highland Community School District at all.

After the A Nation At Risk report came out, Highland, to their credit, began looking at ways that they might improve the educational system for the district’s students.  Since the report left the impression that only the high schools in America needed to be changed, the Highland District turned its attention to the high school.    I remember being asked at the end of my first year what I thought the biggest problem was with the Highland school district.  My answer was simply that too many students couldn’t read at grade level, and I couldn’t understand how they arrived at the high school without that very fundamental and vital skill.  Me and my big mouth; I think every elementary teacher in the district wanted my head on a platter.  ‘How dare he say we’re not doing our jobs.’

My statement had been quickly packaged and rushed to the teachers by the Richard Head that asked me the question in the first place.  It was then that I began to learn the administrative program of divide, deride and chide.  It is also when I began to hear the codes for doing things that made little to no sense at the school.  These code phrases were as follows:  ‘it’s the law,’ ‘some parents are saying,’ ‘some teachers said’ and ‘some of the students are complaining.’  These phrases were generally used when the administration wanted something done or changed, but to wanted to avoid any controversy or objection to the idea.

Highland launched two basic initiatives over the next two or three years to improve instruction at the high school.  Both initiatives were needed and very greatly appreciated by most of the teachers.  The first consisted of a curriculum writing campaign to be put into place a well-defined and accurate curriculum for each course taught at the high school.  The second was the Madeline Hunter method of instruction, (i.e., the development of lesson plans).  Both ideas were giant steps forward, requiring huge amounts of time and effort to complete, and both died the same horrible death just as they began to emerge from their infancy into a viable asset for the students.

Let me explain.  The Madeline Hunter Method is a direct instruction model and teaching method mostly applied to lesson planning.  The model is closely associated with several typical behaviorist and cognitive instructional models developed by Gagne [the nine events of instruction], Bloom [the taxonomy of educational objectives  for the cognitive domain] and Bruner [constructivist theory], and it incorporates mastery learning concepts.  Madeline Hunter was the basic method of instruction that I used because I studied it in college and used it during my first teaching stint.  Familiarity is always helpful when struggling with the development of entire courses in very little time. The process was easy, though time consuming, and extremely helpful in the classroom.

There were problems with the concept from the beginning, however.  Most people had never actually read Madeline Hunter’s original work; therefore, most scholars and advocates took her various findings and turned them into a set of sacred steps or scenarios of seven to nine steps.  We adopted the scenario outlined by Jonathan Mueller to show the phases of a Hunter lesson because it separated the items more clearly than other scenarios (See Scenario below in the Appendix).

I loved this teaching planning and direct instructional method—I understood it, and I’d used it before.  I actually used it for teaching purposes as part of my duties at the University Hospital when I worked there while getting my master’s degree.I was also  using this method when the team of teachers and administrators from Iowa City came to observe me teach, and then spent the entire day because they’d never seen teaching like this before (See A typical lesson in theAppendixfor amoredetailedexample).

Although I was thriving, other teachers were not.  Some mastered the methods fully, but most found themselves in various stages of understanding and mastery.  The major problem was that Highland did not prepare the teachers for the change in structure.  Most of the teachers were successful with the methods they were using and a little unsure of the unknown.  Why change what was already successful and effective?  The administration’s answer was the falsehood, “It’s the law.”  After a few years, I began to “look up” the law scenario, but I never found a single law to support their legal claims.  It was all just a ploy.

I am sorry that this lesson has grown long, but, Cal-Em, you must understand how good ideas fail in a public school setting if you are to create the school system of the future that we so desperately need. My next installment [part II] will fully disclose the destruction of this reform.  In response to your request as to when I’m going to get to the “good stuff” and fully reveal how I, the students and parents were screwed by Highland, I assure you that all the dirty details, the nitty-gritty and the ‘harassification’ [a G.W. Bush word] will be fully exposed.

 

Appendix

Scenario

Getting students set to learn

  • Step 1: Review
  • Step 2: Anticipatory Set
  • Step 3: Objective

Instruction

  • Step 4: Input and Modeling

Checking for understanding

  • Step 5: Checking Understanding
  • Step 6: Guided Practice

Independent practice

  • Step 7: Independent Practice

 

A typical lesson

ME: Yesterday we examined how vivid description used sparingly enhances the image and movement of a story’s characters.  Do you remember how we used color in description to illustrate the mood of both the character and the setting?  John, would you please read that marvelous little paragraph you wrote describing your brother; you know, the one where he destroyed your model car.

ME: Today we will begin to examine how symbolism and the use of figurative language will also assist in the descriptions of characters, places and things, helping our writing come alive in the reader’s mind.

ME: Our goal today is to understand what a simile is, what it does and how it functions in a sentence and how it helps to create images in the reader’s head.  We will also define symbol and its function, and we will practice both ideas through our writing.

NEXT:  I present the information about similes and symbolism through direct instruction, maybe through various sentences on the chalkboard or reading from a handout that I’d created.  I might use examples from professional writers or student writing collected previously.  Students often responded well to examples and models from their own class or from former students they knew.

NEXT: I would check for understanding of the lesson material by asking questions of the students, by answering student questions and by observing the student’s body language, facial expressions and eye movement.  If I was satisfied that the students had a fairly good understanding of what the lesson objectives were, I’d move to guided practice.  Students might be given a number of half-completed sentences [subject part or predicate part] and instructed to complete each fragment by supplying a simile, a symbol or both.  Often, I had students work in little groups around the room [a practice unheard of at Highland] to create and recreate the lesson objectives.

NEXT:  After I was satisfied that all students understood the objectives, I would assign some sort of independent practice.  I was never fond of drill and practice homework, so I usually had the students apply their new knowledge to an existing writing project.  Sometimes, however, to be sure that every student had a command of the concepts taught, I might have a homework assignment due for the next day.  If I had time to allow the independent practice during the class period, I preferred to do it then because I could move around the room, check student progress, answer questions and give little nudges as needed.

 

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Conniption Fits, Dead Horses Beaten to Pulp and Civil Suit: 07/21/2014 Riverside City Council Meeting

beating a dead horse 07212014RCCM

Council Member Nate Kasdorf was absent. Mayor Bill Poch said Kasdorf was not in attendance because he did not get an agenda in enough time to review it before the meeting. Members of the council did not receive it until after the Friday. Council Member Christine Kirkwood asked if Bob Ryan’s check had been issued for his grant. City Administrator/Economic Development Director Rusty Rogerson said it was until “two citizens complained that his scaffolding still is not secure[d] to his building.” When asked again for clarification, Rogerson said that it is done. The question was in relation to why the motion to pay Ryan was left out of the meeting minutes. Later in the meeting, Citizen Kathy Lindhorst questioned whether Bob Ryan met all the requirements on his grants. The mayor said that he has. Lindhorst asked if he was still required to perform renovations, if he is required to get tenants, “or is it just going to be the way it is right now?” Poch said that he is sympathetic to any business downtown. He believes Bob is acting in good faith to get tenants in his buildings. Speaking to the delapitation [sic] of downtown, Lindhorst asked who is going to want to buy the Casa Tequila building when next door there are “bad buildings?” She said Beautification needs to be an ongoing process. The mayor requested the opinion of Washington County Attorney Larry Brock on the special investigation of the City of Riverside for the period July 1, beating a dead horse 07212014RCCM2006 through December 31, 2012. Until he gets recommendations from an investigative unit, Brock said there is nothing his office can do. Brock said that as far as he knows there is no investigation into that audit. Council Member Bob Schneider asked that with the items documented in the investigative audit, is there nothing he can do. Brock reiterated that he receives reports from agencies and then files charges. “It’s an audit, it’s not a law enforcement investigation;” Nothing has been presented to him that would lead him to do so. Although Poch said that he accepts what Brock said, he feels that he could have relayed this information in writing to the city and saved himself a trip, especially when city employees had attempted to contact him “multiple times” regarding this issue over the last year. Brock said he communicated with them and told them the same information and even recommended they contact their city attorney regarding a civil suit if the city so chooses. Schneider said he was confused; he thought Brock was the head legal person for the county (see the quote from the May 5 council meeting below). Brock said, “No, that’s not how it works.” He reiterated again that he is not an investigative office, he prosecutes. Brock said there is “no evidence” here. The only thing they have is the audit report from the auditor. Schneider questioned whether there was enough evidence from the forensic audit. Brock said that was an unrelated matter. Kirkwood said Washington Journal said as much in 6 months ago. At the May 5, 2014 city council meeting,

The Mayor Bill Poch asked Rogerson if the council should make further consideration of thus; ‘is this making us whole?’ Rogerson said it is out of the council’s hands. “The chief law enforcement officer for Washington County is Larry Brock” and it is up to him to pursue any further legal issues. ‘The city council does not have the authority to press charges or prosecute.

During council comments at the end of the meeting, Schneider said a civil action based on the findings of the special investigative audit should be placed on the agenda for discussion. It will appear on an upcoming agenda. Council Member Tom Sexton made a motion to give no Cost of living raises. According to Kirkwood, the records given were subsidiary records, not done in InCode or on Excel; City Clerk Lory Young’s column was not added correctly; Vacation was not included; nor were outstanding pay advances. Schnoebelen agreed with Kirkwood saying that the numbers did not add up. Schneider said, “I guess I’m not going to sit here and squabble over the figures on a piece of paper.” He asked, how can the council justify giving employees cost of living raises when the city’s water and sewer funds are in deficits?

It’s [the council’s]fault that they’re not getting these pay raises, not Rusty’s, not Lory’s….we don’t have the revenue to pay them….it’s not the figures.

[See for yourself; add the columns, do the math, compare; See Employee Wages below in the Appendix]

Schneider requested that the charges from Hart-Frederick (H-F) for June 2 regarding the water main and Methodist church projects (there was the same date on two different invoices). Hart-Frederick’s Benjamin Carhoff said there was a person from H-F observing the water main job and then Carhoff also had business in Riverside; they came from different projects which required driving separately (this accounts for the different rates). The water main is in “substantial completion”; (95%). Schneider asked when cleanup will begin. Carhoff said that they are waiting on a piece that they ordered. Schneider was under the impression that the sites were ready for seeding, and that he thought they would have their “mess” cleaned up. Carhoff said that if they complete their cleanup, they will mess up the soil before they plant grass, and seeding was not until August. Poch said he does not like that the project is not ADA compliant. Carhoff said it was a water main project. Poch said he would like to think Carhoff would keep the city “in the know.” Carhoff said the sidewalks are being put back as they were before, and they were not ADA compliant before; Poch asked why would the city want to put the sidewalk back the way it was when it needs to be ADA compliant? He didn’t think the city wanted to tear up the intersection to make the sidewalk ADA compliant. Schneider said he assumed that this sidewalk would be made ADA compliant when they had done so with other sidewalks. Carhoff answered Schneider’s question a second time stating the project is 95% complete. The expenditures (minus the K & E Flatworks pay estimate), minutes from the previous council meeting and the Riverside Casino Liquor License were approved 4-0. Later in the meeting, K & E Flatworks’ change order for additional storm sewers in the amount of $13332 was approved 4-0. The K &E Flatworks pay estimate in the amount of $90611.38 was approved 4-0. Schneider needed further clarification on the percentage completed on the projected. The Riverside Foundation recommended, via letter presented to the council, placing the Community Center on the 11+ acres purchased near the Riverside Elementary school “per the City Council Resolution”; forming a partnership with the YMCA “to manage the recreational facilities and to provide input on construction of the building”; and the following features (top 10 from the 2012 survey): handicapped accessible parking, exercise equipment, gymnasiums (basketball/volleyball), indoor track, community/senior meals, social area (tables, chairs, card tables), weight room, multi-use room, kitchen/catering, library facility. Recommendations were accepted, 4-0. Since the previous one was a success, and because there is an extra $1000, Rogerson said they should do city clean twice a year. City wide cleanup on September 6; approved 4-0.

As per Rogerson’s recommendation, engravings on the trail benches will be $500 plus the cost of the $125 engraving fee. The $500 would be earmarked for trail improvements. Motion for the bench engraving plus fee was approved 4-0. (When the Forum inquired about this about a month ago, Community Visioning Chairman Larry Simon did not know the prices of the engravings and deferred to Rogerson, who later put in on the agenda for this meeting. A previous Community Visioning Member said that these were the prices early on, but people became disinterested due to the high price.) There were no comments regarding the public hearing on the adoption of the comprehensive plan. The council followed the Planning and Zoning’s recommendation and accepted the comprehensive plan. There were no comments during the public hearing on the annexation of 114th St. Both motions were approved 4-0. The whittling down of the engineers was based on a work session attended only by Schneider and Poch. The they narrowed the engineers to Venstra & Kimm, MMK and McClure Engineering Company (According to their website, “MEC designed the site for the facility including the grading, parking, storm water system, sanitary sewer and water. MEC also designed “off-site” improvements consisting of Highway 22 widening, water and sewer mains, pumping station, wells, and new water and wastewater treatment plants”). Kirkwood made a motion to include Hart-Frederick because they have been beat up based on projects and items they have, in fact, completed. Kirkwood asked Poch not to belabor the fact that there was no second. The motion died. The motion to bring McClure, MMK and Venstra & Kimm was approved 3-1, Kirkwood dissented. Schneider said we have not moved forward (re: infrastructure and Hart Frederick). Despite intermittent interruptions from the mayor, Citizen Mariellen Bower chastised Schneider and Poch for vilifying Hart-Frederick for holding this town’s infrastructure back. “What do you call a new sewer plant, a new water plant, all the underground stuff that we’ve done.” Poch said that McClure Engineering did the work on the water and sewer plants. Bower said, “Mike Hart covered [McClure Engineering’s] butt, and Bill, you know it, on a lot of the issues that [they] dropped the ball on.” Bower was on the council during that time period. Poch said, “I’m not going to agree with those statements, Mariellen.” The council approved a motion to have the State auditor to conduct the audit for fiscal year 2013-14. During a visit regarding the Full Financial audit, members of the council heard that the fund balances were not complete, yet the council just became aware that the reason for that was not dependent upon the completion of the special investigation, but that there is a software glitch common with InCode. The system did not allow the fund balances to be correct. Although they both heard the that all the city’s money is present from Iowa’s Deputy Auditor of State Andrew E. Nielsen, CPA during that meeting with him and Jennifer Campbell, Schneider said that the statement did not include the past year’s, but just the present year (See Summary in the Appendix at the end of this post).   Appendix Employee Wages This is the report compiled by office staff and given to the council regarding Schnoebelen’s 07/07/2014 motion for a compilation of employee wages. Add the column for Lory. ] Rogerson had no comment. employee wages 2014 employee wages 2014 2 employee wages 2014 3 employee wages 2014 4                                 

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July 14- July 20, 2014 Washington County Iowa Sheriff’s Report

http://co.washington.ia.us/publicsafety/newsfs.htm

7/14/2014 23:16 1405573 DP&Q

Location: Riverside

Caller reports fireworks. 92-18 responded in the area. Unable to locate.

7/15/2014 10:12 1405584 Fraud

Location: Riverside

Caller advised 92-17 that she purchased jewelry on Facebook from [redacted] in May and has not received it. Officer will try to contact the other party. For documentation purposes.

7/16/2014 13:57 1405619 All Other Offenses

Location: Riverside

Self ban patron on premises has won jackpot and DCI is not available. Casino called to disregard deputy as subject has left.

7/18/2014 0:03 1405670 Suspicious Activity

Location: Ainsworth

Reports there is a subject along Hwy 218 on the SB side just south Ainsworth. Request someone check on him.

Checked from Ainsworth to Crawfordsville and was unable to locate anyone on foot.

7/19/2013 10:14 1405726 Civil Dispute

Location: Riverside

Landlord received the callers keys from a neighbor and is in her apartment while she is out of town. 110 responded and spoke with the landlord who advised she gave the proper paperwork for eviction. There are only a few things left that belong to the caller and she is welcome to get them, otherwise they will go to the landfill.

7/20/2014 12:25 1405779 Family Offense Non-violent

Location: Riverside

Caller’s husband is refusing to leave. Male subject left the residence. Problem resolved for now.

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River Palooza & Sandburr Rodeo Productions August 16, 2014

Click on flier for more information

 

flier courtesy of City of Riverside

flier courtesy of City of Riverside

Posted in Community, Event, Family, Government, News, Press Release Tagged with: , , , , , , , , ,

07/21/2014 Riverside City Council Meeting Agenda

**Editor’s Note: My apologies for not having this up sooner. I didn’t get it until Saturday, and I was camping all weekend. Thanks to all who reminded me.

Rccm07212014 agenda

Posted in Community, Government, News Tagged with: , , , , , ,

Screwed: LESSON 6, Napolians and Mussolinis and demi-gods Oh, my! [repeat several times, then follow the yellow brick road.]

screwed pic Nick Smith

***Please read the disclaimer to the right. The following is the latest in several installments by former teacher and school board member for the Highland Community School District, Nick Smith. They are lessons to a future student, Cal-Em (read Screwed: Lesson #1  and Screwed: Lesson #2 , Screwed: Lesson #3, Part I,   Screwed: Lesson #3, Part II , Screwed: LESSON 4–I START AGAIN , Lesson 5: A Nation At Risk report [part 1], Lesson 5: A Nation at Risk report [part 2],  Screwed: LESSON 5–A Nation at Risk report [part 3])

 

Nick SmithLETTERS TO CAL-EM A PERSONAL HISTORY OF HIGHLAND

 

By Nick Smith

Once, Cal-Em, one of the Richard Heads decided that Highland needed to cut their teaching staff by three teachers. Those hard decisions must be made, but Mr. Richard Head targeted three veteran teachers for termination in violation of the agreed upon contract between the Highland Community School District and the Highland Education Association and the discrimination laws of Iowa and the United States. In short, seniority was not used as the instrument determining the terminations, all three were female and all three were over the age of forty, a protected class under State and Federal employee age discrimination laws.

As the union rights chair, I had the task of protesting and opposing this discrimination and contractual violation. I arrived at the office, only to be ordered out accompanied by swearing. I then wrote a formal, second step grievance complaint, which outlined the contractual violation and complained about the obvious discrimination involved. Mr. Head tore the grievance into unbelievably small pieces, tossed them into the air and snarled, “It doesn’t exist! Get the hell out of my office!”

Later, I took a copy of the grievance and a witness back to Mr. Richard Head’s office. This time he accepted the grievance, but rushed around his desk, pushed me to the wall, and then struck the witness who fought back, pinning the superintendent against the wall. I thought the witness was going to injure Mr. Head badly, but they merely told him to keep his hands to himself. Of course, the grievance was denied in writing before we left the office. The next step in the procedure was to present the grievance at step three to the same district representative that step two had just been denied, a flaw in the procedure that never could be corrected.

A few days later, Mr. Richard Head interrupted my class and presented me with a pink-slip. True, it was actually a pink slip of paper, which announced my termination at the end of the school year, emphasizing the fact that my contract would not be renewed. I wasn’t the only teacher terminated that day between the hours of noon and three o’clock. Every teacher in the district was terminated on that day, the Ides of March. I think every teacher in the building was out in the hallway, some angry, some crying and some dumbfounded. I don’t think much teaching occurred the rest of the year.

The Highland Association President was ordered to come up with a better way to reduce staff if they could. Of course, by applying the procedure outlined in the contract, the correct three teachers to be terminated were identified. They each requested a meeting with the School board and all of the terminated teachers began the grievance procedure for wrongful termination and civil rights violations of discrimination. Eventually, every teacher was issued a contract for the next year, even me. Mr. Richard Head said he was just kidding. It was a joke, and none of us had a sense of humor. The results, Cal-Em, were predictable.

When I accepted the nomination and election of “rights chair” by the Highland Education Association, little did I know how much that post would affect my life. I didn’t know that I would hold that position for 25 years, nor did I know of the great retaliation and harassment I would endure for the sake of other teachers, students and parents. The “rights chair” was a targe

t for every new administrator entering the district. I understand some of their animosity; after all, people do not like to have their decisions questioned, nor do they enjoy having their decisions held up to scrutiny by others. Employer decisions affect people, and teachers are people, too, regardless of what some may think. Teachers are not property, they are not big students, and they are not cattle. Teachers may have been ground down to less than people due to the constant bashing they have and are enduring from the likes of the Nation at Risk report, business agendas, private and government reform groups and the uninformed public, but I assure you, they are people.

Once I was in the central office in the high school. One of the secretaries [as they were known at the time] said, “Hey, didn’t I see you in church at St. Patrick’s in Iowa City this last Sunday? You have a lovely family. Sometimes we get to the later service at St. Pat’s when we don’t get around so early in the morning.”

Suddenly, before I could respond, Mr. Richard Head came crashing out of his office in a visible state of anger. His face was a bright red, his fists clenched, his body language flashed rage and he could barely control his own movements.

“Catholic!” he screamed, spittle gushing from his mouth like a spray bottle, covering the counter and the floor. “If I would have known you were one of them Catholics, I never would have hired

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you. I’ve been trying to get rid of all you mackerel snappers!”

He turned as if he were on military parade and marched himself back into his office. I was shocked, stunned into disbelief. Looking around, everyone’s mouth was agape in disbelief. No one spoke a word, but several people rolled their eyes and one woman spun her index finger around her right ear, indicating that this Richard Head might also be a lost nut from a fruitcake. We looked at each other, stunned.

“That little girl of yours,” one woman gratefully interjected through the shock and tension, “is just adorable. How old is she, anyway?”

“She’s eleven months old,” I replied. My mind, however, wasn’t on my response. I thought I was done with Catholic haters; I thought that had ended a long time ago. Sure, when I was a kid there were people who didn’t like me because of my faith, but I thought that had disappeared with the movement for civil rights and the various laws passed that prohibited discrimination of all types, even religious discrimination. I was wrong. I apparently was working under a true bigot who hated me, not for my color, but for my religion, and I hadn’t even picked it. I was born Catholic—what is known as a cradle catholic—and raised to believe what the Catholic faith taught in its dogma. True, my family was the only Catholic family in my entire extended family. My grandparents, my aunts and uncles, my cousins and my other relatives down to third and fourth cousins were all Protestant on my mom’s side of the family, and that’s where we lived. My dad’s people were all catholic, but we only saw them once a year and they had no cousins my age.   I grew up understanding that denominations didn’t really mater very much because no matter what you called yourself, you were still a Christian. You believed in Christ and that’s what mattered most.

Sure, there were a few misunderstandings because the rituals that Catholics followed were different from the mainstream Protestant view of church, these differences led to marvelous discussions with my cousins as we grew older and helped to broaden all our understandings of faith and truth. Now, I’m working for a Catholic hater. I could feel the hate ooze from his pores every time I was around him. The worst part was listening to the bulls#*t [I am sorry Cal-Em for the language, but during that time in Iowa, that is what we called lies and half-truths] he spewed from his mouth in great torrents of half-truths, idiotic side steps and outlandish claims of superiority. Almost every weekend, Mr. Richard Head ran in a foot race, a marathon or distance run. Every week he’d come in showing a trophy he’d won. Sadly, we learned that the trophies were not presented to him, but made by him in his own woodshop, and then passed off as being some sort of official award.

Richard Head signed an agreement granting me a Specialist Degree equivalency if I completed 36 hours of graduate work beyond my masters. The University of Iowa dropped its specialty degree program the year before I wanted to start, so my only option was to work toward a PhD degree. One of my personal sadnesses was in finishing all of the course work for a PhD, and then being told that I needed to work as an associate professor for two or three years while writing my PhD thesis paper.  I remember telling my advisor that I couldn’t do that because I had three children that wanted to eat every day. He told me there was a stipend of $4,800 per year for associate teaching, but that wasn’t nearly enough to pay my bills and keep three kids in breakfast cereal.

When he [Mr. Richard Head] found that I was going to accomplish the task, he flew into a rage and denied he’d ever agreed to such a thing. His replacement had to honor the agreement because it was in writing; thus, I moved to the last and highest pay lane in the Highland pay matrix system. I believe I was paid $800 additional for having the Specialty Degree, about $66 dollars per month more. I was happy to make the extra money and the Highland Community School District got the benefits of having basically, a PhD degree teacher in their English department for a very small price.

I was interviewed for an English teaching position in Iowa City. A delegation of administrators and teachers came to Highland to observe my teaching as part of their interview process. They were going to observe during the first and maybe the second periods but ended up staying for the entire day, observing all of my classes. They left very impressed with one member telling me that the job was mine for sure. All four observers mentioned how impressed they were with my teaching, having never seen anything like it before and declaring that I was onto an entirely new method of instruction.   I didn’t hear from them until I received a letter in the mail informing me that the position had been awarded to someone else.   I asked an Iowa City Principal who lived in my neighborhood and was a member of the interview team what happened—why wasn’t I hired? He said, “Your superintendent caught us on our way out, saying you were a trouble maker and a big union guy. He recommended we have nothing to do with you, so we backed off.”

I confronted Mr. Richard Head on Monday concerning his comments and negative recommendations, asking why he would do such a thing and take this job opportunity away from me. He simply ginned his idiotic smirk, the kind of smirk that everyone wants to wipe off the smirker’s face with something more than Kleenex. “That will teach you to stick your nose in where it doesn’t belong and isn’t wanted,” he said through curled lips. Then, he uttered a little chuckle and walked away. There are those people in the world that are just evil because they are just evil. He was one of them.

One year before on the last day before what used to be known as Christmas break, two Highland board members came to school drunk on their asses. They wandered about the hallways holding each other up and bouncing off lockers, shouting Christmas cheers and happy New Year’s around the school.   Bursting into my classroom, they offered drinks of “booze” from quart jars held in their hands. “Come on,” one complaint, “ain’t none of you f­­­­­!#*you [you get the picture] gonna have a teeny-weenie drinky-pooh with us?”

“Come on,” the other begged, “just one little drinky. Party pooper! You have a drink right now or I’ll have your butt fired!”

Then they went staggering down the hall to another room. I had another teacher watch my room and her own room—no student was learning anything anyway, so I and beat a path to the superintendent’s office. The superintendent was unresponsive. “It’s hard enough to have some sort of meaningful class on the last day before Christmas vacation,” I stammered, “but this disruption is ridiculous!”

“Handle it yourself,” Mr. Richard Head chided, “you always think you’re so smart.”

I did. I took his phone and dialed the Washington County Sheriff’s Department, reporting unwanted intruders at the high school causing a disturbance. You should have seen that Richard Head move then. He got the drunken board members out of the building before the deputies arrived. My popularity with the school board and Mr. Richard Head was not very good after that.

That my dear Cal-Em is how a teacher starts to be labeled a troublemaker.

 

Posted in Column, Community, Essay, Government, Guest Post, News, School Tagged with: , , , , , , , ,

Out of the Wreckage: Scholarship for Car Crash Victims

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Freedigitalphotos.net

Press Release SAN FRANCISCO, July 16, 2014 /PRNewswire/ — After the dust has settled, the injuries have healed, and there’s a replacement car in the driveway, victims of automobile accidents often still face an uphill battle trying to move on with their lives. According to psychologists, for some the fear never really goes away. It’s common enough that the National Institutes of Health gives physicians specific recommendations for patients exhibiting acute stress symptoms and PTSD after motor vehicle accidents. With more than 3 million injury accidents a year nationwide, the San Francisco Bay Area personal injury law firm Appel Law Firm LLP, sees their share of the aftermath – only they decided to do something about it.

The 2014 Auto Accident Survivor Scholarship is open to students currently enrolled in an accredited US college or university who have either been injured in a serious motor vehicle accident themselves or have been deeply affected by another’s. Applicants for the $1,000 scholarship are asked to submit an application, college transcripts, a police report or other proof documenting the accident and a short essay about how the event altered their lives.

“My job as an injury attorney is to seek full and fair settlements for my clients,” said attorney Thomas Appel. “But getting back to normal is still a challenge. We want to support those who are moving forward in their lives.”

In a case presented in the American Family Physician magazine, a 34 year-old man was still suffering anxiety and bizarre behaviors due to an accident he had nearly a dozen years earlier. His physical injuries were long healed and the insurance settlement spent. But the emotional scars had him pulling over to the side of the road a couple times a week. He would go into a dissociative state, unable to drive safely. Further, because he was trapped during the accident and had lost bowel control, he was now unable to use the toilet without a cleaning regimen lasting 20 or 30 minutes.

“These are everyday heroes,” said Thomas. “They aren’t complaining to anyone, just shouldering the burden of a past trauma and doing the best they can.”

The scholarship application can be found at the firm’s website: and the deadline for submission is July 31st. The scholarship will be awarded August 10th, with notification by the 15th. A check will be sent to the winner’s school to help pay tuition or related expenses. Graduate students are also encouraged to apply.

Mr. Appel also cautions anyone who is having symptoms of a stress disorder due to an automobile accident to seek professional medical help. He notes that effective treatments are available and victims shouldn’t blame themselves or fear negative stereotyping.
Information on PTSD and motor vehicle accidents:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2396820/
http://www.aafp.org/afp/1999/0801/p524.html 

Posted in Community, News, Press Release, School Tagged with: , , ,

Gov. Branstad Orders Flags at Half-staff

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Gov. Terry E. Branstad orders flags at half-staff to honor World War II veteran repatriated Missing in action World War II Airman Staff Sgt. Robert E. Howard

After remaining missing for 69 years, Moulton, Iowa, native to return home Saturday to final resting place at Sunset View Cemetery in Moulton

Press Release (DES MOINES) – Gov. Terry Branstad has ordered flags to be flown at half-staff in Iowa from 5 p.m. Friday, July 18, 2014, until 8 a.m. Monday, July 21, 2014, in honor of U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Robert “Bobby” E. Howard, formerly of Moulton, Iowa. A photo of Staff Sgt. Howard may be found here.

www.governor.iowa.gov

Howard, a 21-year old serving with the 450th Bomber Squadron, 322nd Bomber Group, Medium, 9th Air Force, U.S. Army Air Corps, was last seen April 16, 1945, as his unit was conducting a bombing mission over Germany. His flight was shot down and crashed near Wittenburg, Germany. Only one of the six crew members was able to parachute from the aircraft and was taken prisoner by German forces. Howard and four other crewmembers were declared deceased, but their remains were never found.

In 2012, the Joint Prisoner of War/Missing in Action Accounting Command – Central Identification Laboratory (JPAC) received information from German Officials of human remains found within a burial site located close to the possible aircraft crash site. In 2014, JPAC’s Research and Analysis Group concluded a historical association drawn from Missing Air Crew Report #14463 and artifacts and human remains recovered at the excavation site. Mitochondrial DNA testing positively identified part of the remains belonging to Staff Sgt. Howard.

Robert Howard was born December, 19, 1923, in Moulton, Iowa. He graduated from Moravia Public School in Moravia, Iowa, in 1941, and participated in marching band, orchestra, concert band and dramatics.

Howard enlisted in the U.S. Army on March 19, 1943, and transferred into the U.S. Air Army Air Corps. His military awards and honors include the Purple Heart, Air Medal (with one silver and two bronze Oak Leaf Clusters), Army Good Conduct Medal, American Campaign Medal, European-African-Middle Eastern Campaign Medal (with three bronze service stars), World War II Victory Medal and Enlisted Crew Wings.

Howard is survived by brothers Harold and Dennis, both of Des Moines, sisters Evelyn Lewin of Indianola, Janie Ballanger of Coatsville, Mo., and Evelyn June Nance of Tulsa, Okla., and by many nieces, nephews and extended family members. His parents and his sister, Betty Howard Harvey are deceased.

The Governor’s directive applies to all U.S. and state flags under the control of the state. H.R. 692, signed in 2007, requires federal government agencies in the state to comply with the Governor’s Executive Order that the U.S. flag be flown at half-staff in the event of the death of a member of the Armed Forces.

A memorial service will be held at Sunset View Cemetery in Moulton, Iowa, on July 19, 2014, at 11 a.m., with full military honors provided by the Iowa National Guard. The cemetery is located north of Moulton, at the northeast corner of highway 202 and 535th Street. The memorial service is open the public.

Flags will be at half-staff on the State Capitol Building and on flag displays in the Capitol Complex, and upon all public buildings, grounds, and facilities throughout the state. Individuals, businesses, schools, municipalities, counties and other government subdivisions are encouraged to fly the flag at half-staff for the same length of time as a sign of respect.

Posted in Community, Government, News, Press Release Tagged with: , , , , , , ,

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